11/03/2008

Cornucopia Lunch

Can you believe Thanksgiving is only three weeks away?! Anytime is a great time to talk about being thankful, these are an easy lunch and a great conversation starter about how much we are blessed. Just fill it with whatever ingredients your kids like to much on for lunch! Below is also a history of the cornucopia and a few activity ideas. Have fun!


Cornucopia Lunch
Ingredients:
Whole Wheat Tortillas
2 Spaghetti noodles, uncooked (or toothpicks)
Filling ingredients (We used ham slices, cheese, baby corn, and carrots)
Ranch dressing to dip, optional

Directions:
Cut tortillas in half. Roll one half up to form a horn shape (see video tutorial). Secure with a piece of raw spaghetti noodle or toothpick.

video

Fill with your favorite lunch ingredients. Add some ranch dressing for dipping, if desired. Serve and enjoy a lunch chat about being thankful!

Activity Ideas:
You can download a cornucopia coloring and cut out activity
here.

After lunch, you can make a cornucopia from a piece of brown construction paper or a brown shopping bag. Let the kids cut out things from old magazines that they are thankful for and fill their "cornucopia"
Cornucopia Information (from You're History!):
Derived from the Latin Cornu = horn, Copia = abundance.
The cornucopia is a horn-shaped container overflowing with fruit, nuts, and vegetables. Its origin as a symbol of abundance comes from Greek mythology. Zeus was raised on goat’s milk by Amalthea. In gratitude, he gave her a goat’s horn that had the poser to grant the wishes of whoever possessed it. Zeus also set the image of a goat into the night sky, as the constellation Capricorn. Since the 5th century BCE, gods and goddesses, especially Fortuna, goddess of luck and fate, would be depicted carrying a cornucopia.
Today the “Horn of Plenty” is a symbol of the abundance of the harvest, most often associated in America with the Thanksgiving holiday. No longer is it a genuine goat’s horn, but rather a large, cone-shaped wicker basket. Though the material may have changed, the meaning of the cornucopia has persisted throughout the centuries, and many a horn of plenty graces the center of the Thanksgiving dinner table.
my notes: in some versions, Zeus broke off her horn by accident and he blessed and returned it because he felt bad.